Advertisement One

Advertising Agency: BBDO
Creative Director: Giles Fichteberg, Jean Francois Sacco
Client: France Adot
Copywriter: Antoine Palle
Illustrator: Johnny Glover

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Content

This advertisement was designed for France ADOT to raise awareness of organ, tissue and bone marrow donations. There are three adverts that make the series for ADOT and were released in 2011. In this particular advert, there is a young lady sitting on a hospital bed wearing a dressing gown. She is in the centre of the advert hugging what appears to be a ‘ghost’ transparent figure of an older lady who is sitting across from her on the bed. In the far right corner there is a phrase that reads ‘Thousands of people owe their lives to organ donors’, with the France ADOT logo placed below.

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Semiotic Analysis:

Iconic Signs

The designers have chosen to use photography of real people to symbolise the meanings and ideologies of organ donations. In this particular advertisement chosen it can be said that the two people are the signifier that represent the signified body copy and the overall ADOT awareness campaign. The photography of both the women can be seen as an icon for the campaign because of the props and settings, and their projected physical health and interaction.

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Indexical Signs

The environment of the advertisement series is a hospital setting. The viewer is able to see basic ideologies that are otherwise known as ‘Denotation semiology’. The props such as the hospital bed and scrubs dressing gown provide this indication of the placed settings. This advertisement is a realistic narrative that many retrievers of organ donations experience. The imagery provides the viewer that there is a sense of gratitude and happiness for those who have retrieved a donation in someway.

Symbolic (arbitrary) Signs

The relation between the two women (the signifier) and the phrase (the signified) ‘Thousands of people owe their lives to organ donors’ play an interweaving role of representation. The lady that is not the patient is wearing normal everyday clothing, and is not wearing scrubs like the patient she is hugging. The older woman is part of ‘Paradigmatic Relation’ where she is instantly identified as an organ donor due to the accompanying phrase. The use of transparency on the organ donor shows the audience that she is no longer alive. She is now a spirit and is imaginatively being thanked by the organ retriever. There is a lot of light in the advertisements photograph that may be seen as representing a brighter outcome for the younger woman.

The older woman representing the organ donor is being embraced by the young life she saved. The young woman’s expression shows intense gratitude and joy for now being healthy enough to live a longer lasting life. This advertisement is a medium modality sequence as it is not obvious straight away when you see the image, but once the viewer reads accompanying text you are able to connect the undertones.

Advertisement Two

Creative Director: Pier Madonia and Canadian Stuart Macmillan
Client: International Red Cross
url: http://shape-and-colour.com/2008/04/01/red-cross-compassion-tolerance-awareness/

cross3 red-cross-2 red-cross-1

 

Content

This advertisement series was designed for the International Red Cross to bring awareness to health issues in general across the world and that we as a conscious and smart species need to have more compassion awareness and tolerance. In the advertisement the art directors have chosen to place a familiar medical object such as a blood transfusion bag, a glass bottle containing liquid and a packet of pills. The advertisement  based on compassion will be  the poster analyzed.

Semiotic Analysis:

Iconic Signs

The designers have chosen to use a photograph of a blood transfusion bag that is in the center of the advertisement. There is a label on the blood bag that reads the large title ‘Compassion’. The blood bag is the Signifier and the text can be both the signifier and the signified as they both play the correlating role in the representation.

 

Indexical Signs

The environment for the blood bag may resemble a medical setting due to the sterile light on the image and the shadowing in the corners of the advertisement. The viewer is able to see basic ideologies that are otherwise known as ‘Connotation Semiology’. The colour red can symbolize the word compassion because of its derived correlation to love. To love something you are showing a sense of compassion. This advertisement is a pun advertisement as it shows that we as a species need to firstly have a transfusion of Compassion and then we all may feel the need to help one another and donate blood.

 

Symbolic (arbitrary) Signs

The relation between the blood transfusion bag (the signifier) and the text (the signified) play an interweaving role of representation. Blood can be quiet confronting to most people especially seeing it in advertisement. Audiences to advertisements cannot control what they see in a magazine add, or a billboard. Advertisements can be confronting and effective and that’s exactly what this advertisement seeks. This advertisement has a ‘Paradigmatic Relation’ of the text and image as they correlate with one another and help reach to the audience in this abrupt way. Most people in the world have taken some sort of medication whether its to strengthen your immune system, provide you with something you don’t have enough of or reducing pain. Majority of society believe we obtain compassion, when they see this advertisement this is questioned. Do you really have compassion though? Enough to physically help other people in need?

These advertisements are a high modality sequence as it is quiet obvious straight away when you see the image and the large accompanying word that you are able to connect the undertones.

References:

Bell, P, (2001). Content Analysis of Visual Images. In Van Leeuwen, Theo and Jewitt, Carey, Handbook of visual analysis, (pp.10 – 35). SAGE.

Hansen, Lone Koefoed (2014). What’s in a word? :why natural isn’t objectively better. Interactions 21 (1) pp.22-23

O’Neill, Shaleph, (2008). Chapter 5 : Semiotic Theory : Signs and Signification. In O’Neill, Shaleph, Interactive media : the semiotics of embodied interaction, (pp.67 – 82). London : Springer.

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